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Homepage Centerpiece Survey

At HighEdWeb 2010 in Cincinnati I will be giving a presentation on the role and strategy surrounding centerpieces on home pages in higher ed. This information will be used in a 100% anonymous manner to reinforce and inform certain points that I will be making. The information you provide will be extremely helpful in ensuring [...]

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How Luther College is using Reason

How Luther College is using Reason

For the past decade Dreamweaver and Contribute were the primary web workhorses at Luther College. In 2005 EZ Publish, an open-source content management system (CMS), was chosen to process admissions applications. The following year EZ Publish was decommissioned, and the entire admissions site and home page were moved into a commercial CMS, which failed to [...]

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Website Optimization: The Why and How (Part I)

Website Optimization: The Why and How (Part I)

When I talk about web optimization I’m specifically talking about all the technical things that you can do to speed up the load time of your web pages.  Let’s be honest, there are A LOT of things that you can do to improve this as we will cover over this two part article.  The first [...]

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Mobile PittState - How We Did It With No Money or Resources

Mobile PittState – How We Did It With No Money or Resources

I promised a followup to the mobile site roundup, and by jimminy I deliver. If you follow me on Twitter, you’ve probably caught wind of the release of Pittsburg State University’s new mobile web site. This has been a big step for us for a number of reasons. Our deployment isn’t perfect, we aren’t as [...]

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How Victor Valley College is Using OmniUpdate’s OU Campus

How Victor Valley College is Using OmniUpdate’s OU Campus

When we started using OU Campus in October of 2006, we signed up for the 25-user license package, and opted for the SaaS (software-as-a-service) model or ‘hosted‘ plan, where OmniUpdate handles the hosting and delivery of the service to us, and all CMS users access the system solely through a web browser . At that [...]

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How Edinboro University is Using dotCMS

How Edinboro University is Using dotCMS

At Edinboro University we use a content management system called dotCMS.  dotCMS is an Enterprise-level, open source CMS and is based on Java.  dotCMS also integrates with many well-known open source technologies such as:

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Inbound Marketing Success Story and Takeaway

Inbound Marketing Success Story and Takeaway

Disclaimer: I work at HubSpot.  Many of you who read this blog already know that, but I still want to be extremely transparent before I write this.  I’ve also worked at a college for six years, so I’ve been there and done that too.

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How Le Moyne College is Using DotNetNuke

How Le Moyne College is Using DotNetNuke

In the beginning, Le Moyne College’s main website was powered by a set of static web pages with a small dose of custom-written ASP to serve as our first entry into content management.  As typically happens on campuses everywhere, as Le Moyne began a branding revision in 2008, one common theme that was echoed across [...]

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How Duke University is Using Drupal

How Duke University is Using Drupal

Lately, I have heard Drupal referred to as a “framework” in addition to a content management system. After building several Drupal sites, I would have to agree. A core Drupal installation gives you very little to start with. However, with the help of widely-used contributed modules, you can build anything from a personal blog, up [...]

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3 Things Higher Ed Can Learn from the iPad (for Better or Worse)

3 Things Higher Ed Can Learn from the iPad (for Better or Worse)

I’ve been thinking about this one ever since the big announcement came. Rather than give Apple the halo effect or the horn effect and hold it up as the model of what to do or what not to do, I thought these few lessons were a bit of both:

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