Tag Archive | "web"

[Results] Web Services Department Structure Survey

Monday, September 13, 2010

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[Results] Web Services Department Structure Survey

This post was written by Matt Herzberger. Matt is the Director of Web Communications at Florida International University and co-founder of http://BlogHighEd.org/

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[Survey] Web Services Department Structure

Tuesday, August 24, 2010

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It’s that time of year again. This survey was suggested by Matt Herzberger, Director of Web Communications at Florida International University with input from Karlyn Morissette, Michael Fienen, Kyle James, Chas Grundy from Notre Dame, Dave Olsen from West Virginia, and myself.

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Higher Ed Web Analytics: What’s Really Important to Report?

Thursday, April 15, 2010

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Ok. I’m sure most of us know what’s important. Kyle, for one, has done an excellent job in helping us all - myself included - in understanding how to use analytics to improve our higher ed web pages. But what I’m talking about here is: what’s important to tell your VP or others? As a [...]

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[Results] State of the University Web Department survey

Monday, November 23, 2009

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[Results] State of the University Web Department survey

253 Total Responses First and foremost I wanted to thank everyone who took the time to fill out the survey. The feedback from this has been amazing and I know everyone has been anticipating the results. These results will help others shape and make informed decisions about their web environment. I have a feeling most [...]

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5 min survey: State of the university Web department

Thursday, October 15, 2009

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5 min survey: State of the university Web department

Last week myself, Michael Fienen and Karlyn Morissette had the privilege of speaking at the HighEdWeb 2009 Conference. I can’t explain how great it was to see so many higher education web professionals, I feel humbled being around so many awesome people doing great things.

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Save your sanity and use a grid

Friday, September 18, 2009

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Save your sanity and use a grid

University web designers have a tough enough job as it is, juggling users needs while pleasing committees and numerous other stakeholders. Doesn’t matter if your web office has complete control or just influence, using a grid can make completely unrelated sites look uniform.

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Show Me The Conversions

Tuesday, September 15, 2009

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The job of a college admissions office is to enroll students at the institution. That is their sole reason for being. It is why the college invests money in them. It’s why the admissions staff has jobs.

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Redesign once, increment forever.

Wednesday, April 8, 2009

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Redesign once, increment forever.

Over the past few weeks I’ve been thinking about web site redesigns and what a ridiculous process it can be in higher education. Even a simple site (40-100 pages) at my University takes anywhere from two months to a full year depending on how many people are involved.

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Reining in the outliers for a university-wide cohesive social media presence

Friday, April 3, 2009

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Reining in the outliers for a university-wide cohesive social media presence

Earlier this week we talked about a cohesive university-wide Web presence. Today we’re going to take that same theory, but explore it in the social media space.

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Taking the idea of a cohesive Web template in a slightly different direction

Thursday, April 2, 2009

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Taking the idea of a cohesive Web template in a slightly different direction

Earlier this week I wrote about reining in the outliers for a university-wide cohesive Web presence. Todd Sanders (@tsand) from the University of Wisconsin, Green Bay, had the gall to disagree with me (“for the first time EVER,” I’ll have you note), arguing that the art department shouldn’t look like the business department Web site. [...]

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